Liang Wei at ".com/.cn", Co-presented by KAF and MoMA PS1

.COM/.CN
Curators: Klaus Biesenbach and Peter Eleey
Date: 21.3.2017 – 30.4.2017
Co-presenters: K11 Art Foundation, MoMA PS1
Participating artists: Darren Bader, Cao Fei, DIS, Aleksandra Domanovic, Greg Edwards, Li Ming, Liang Wei, Lin Ke, Liu Shiyuan, Miao Ying, Oliver Payne, Sondra Perry, Wang Xin, and Anicka Yi
Venue: K11 Art Foundation Pop-up Space, G/F, Cosco Tower, 33 Wing Lok Street, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

The K11 Art Foundation (KAF) and MoMA PS1 co-present .com/.cn, the first project jointly presented by the two institutions as part of an ongoing research partnership. Co-curated by Klaus Biesenbach and Peter Eleey of MoMA PS1 in New York, com/.cn includes work by Darren Bader, Cao Fei, DIS, Aleksandra Domanovic, Greg Edwards, Lauren Owens, Li Ming, Liang Wei, Lin Ke, Liu Shiyuan, Miao Ying, Oliver Payne, Sondra Perry, Wang Xin, and Anicka Yi.

.com/.cn showcases artistic practices in China and the West that respond to, or are affected by, our digital ecosystem. Frequently described as a “network” or a “cloud,” this system is often assumed to be universal, unencumbered by territory, language, law, or national culture. However, distinct regional internets have developed under varying forms of state control, each conditioning different social behaviours, economies, and modes of thought. These variations are particularly evident in comparing artistic responses to the available internets of China and the West, and their respective political and economic systems.


Some of the works selected for .com/.cn examine the Chinese digital ecosystem, its permeability to Western content, and the cultural aspirations it both encourages and limits. Others reflect artists’ use of regional platforms for research and communication – for example Google, Facebook, Weibo, and WeChat – and their influence.


Paintings in the exhibition propose new abstract spaces that combine historical Chinese and Western vocabularies with contemporary pictorial schematic devices. Prosthetics and avatars supplement and replace the body. Real geographies are set against technological representations and imaginary terrains, evoking the challenges facing the liberal ideals of globalization in an age of nationalist retrenchment.